Mark Mattson, Ph.D.

Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences
National Institute on Aging
Baltimore, Maryland

After receiving his Ph.D. degree from the University of Iowa, Dr. Mattson completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Developmental Neuroscience at Colorado State University.  He then joined the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine where he advanced to Full Professor.  In 2000, Dr. Mattson took the position of Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore.  He is also a Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he is the director of a course on the Neurobiology of Aging.  Dr. Mattson leads a multi-faceted research team that applies cutting-edge technologies in research aimed at understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms of brain aging and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, and stroke.  His work has elucidated how the brain responds adaptively to challenges such as fasting and exercise, and he has used that information to develop novel interventions to promote optimal brain function throughout life.  He has published more than 800 articles, and has edited 10 books in the areas of signal transduction, cellular stress responses, neurodegenerative disorders and mechanisms of aging.  Dr. Mattson has been among the most highly cited neuroscientist in the world during the past 20 years with an ‘h’ index of over 180.   He has received many awards including the Metropolitan Life Foundation Medical Research Award, the Alzheimer’s Association Zenith Award, the Santiago Grisolia Chair Prize and the Tovi Comet-Walerstein Science Award. He was elected an AAAS Fellow in 2011.  He is Editor-in-Chief of Ageing Research Reviews and and is a Section or Reviewing Editor for Nature Communications, the Journal of Neuroscience, Trends in Neurosciences, the Neurobiology of Aging, and Aging and Mechanisms of Disease.

 


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